Building Awareness for The League of Women Voters

Designing a crowdsourced storytelling platform

Project for UX Design Immersive at General Assembly


 The current League of Women Voters website homepage

The current League of Women Voters website homepage

Skills:

Surveys
Interviews
User Personas
Journey Mapping
Competitive Research
Affinity Mapping
Sketching
Digital Mockups
Contextual Inquiry
Design Studio
Presentation Creation
Public Speaking

 

Team: 3

Time Frame:  1.5 weeks

My Role:  UX Researcher

 

The problem

Tracking Local Interest Through Storytelling

The League of Women Voters is a longstanding nonpartisan organization that educates the public (not just women) on voter education issues and critical issues like immigration and the environment.

LWV wanted to track interest on topics at the local level and explore the role of storytelling to get a better idea of what’s on the mind of the public.

Since they are volunteer run with hundreds of local leagues, we knew we needed to design a solution that could be easily understood and replicated across chapters.


The Solution

Short & Long Term Engagement Strategies

Short term: We designed a marketing campaign driven by “card templates” for local leagues to easily create content shareable across mediums, trackable by hashtag.

Long term: We designed a new site page where the public can (1) share their opinions using a story generator and can (2) view other stories sortable by location and topic.


Our Process

Rapid Insight Generation

Our team conducted a mix of qualitative and quantitative research on how people educate themselves about current events and how they share content about causes they care about, including:

  • A survey with 50 responses

  • 15 In-depth Interviews

  • A site visit to a LWV meeting in San Francisco

To better understand the different types of people our design solution should consider, we organized and distilled our data into 3 main insights:

  1. People want a quick way to understand issues and how to take action

  2. People educate themselves and engage across multiple platforms and formats

  3. People are more interested to learn and share about a cause when they feel angry

This validated our original hypothesis that: if we create a quick and easy way for people to digest, tell, and share stories, people will more likely to spread awareness and engage with the League.

 Results from a civic engagement survey completed by 50 people within a 48 hour period

Results from a civic engagement survey completed by 50 people within a 48 hour period

 
 

Prioritizing the Highest Impact Solution

Our team put our heads together for a quick ideation session where we generated as many different solutions as possible. We plotted our collection of possible solutions according to level of anticipated effort and impact. This made is easy to see which solutions would have the highest impact, informing our selection of a short and long term strategy.

 Chart mapping out different design solutions according to level of impact and effort

Chart mapping out different design solutions according to level of impact and effort

 

Understanding Different Contexts

We created three user personas and scenarios to demonstrate different combinations of technology usage and sharing behavior. The scenarios served as checkpoints to ensure that our design solutions worked across a range of situations.

 One of three user persona: Quincy the "Nonpublic Citzen"

One of three user persona: Quincy the "Nonpublic Citzen"


Deliverables

Our short term solution considered people with different sharing behaviors: LWV distributes a marketing campaign template to local leagues that would produce “cards” that could be shared by email, text, or across social media platforms. Asking local leagues to use a template would ensure a standardized visual brand more easily recognizable at the national level. It would also take the thought work out of designing marketing assets for non-designers.

 Digital mockups: an example of local league use of campaign card template

Digital mockups: an example of local league use of campaign card template

LWV - Prop C mockup LWV.png
 

Our long term solution considered how people are more likely to share about a cause when they personally know someone affected: LWV creates site page where people can share their opinions and view others. Taking inspiration from organizations like StoryCorps and Humans of New York, we designed wireframes for how the site page could quickly inform a visitor about their ability to contribute their opinion.

 Final version of wireframe, created by teammate Daniel Sasson

Final version of wireframe, created by teammate Daniel Sasson

 

Designing for Intuitive Use

We sat down with five different people to observe their behavior moving through our interactive prototype of the story creation flow. We took insights from these usability evaluations into consideration when refining the design layout and copy.

 Usability Evaluations with Susan Wolfe and Andrea Lau

Usability Evaluations with Susan Wolfe and Andrea Lau

LWV - usability studies.JPG

Results and Reflections

Wide-ranging Application

This challenge required a mix of UX design and marketing competencies. We had to understand what actually motivates people to share their stories, not just design a way for them to share.

We were working with a small data pool compared to the size of the League and the scope of their work. If we were to continue progressing in this project, we would want to collect more information from people outside major cities.

Our design solution is not hyper-specific to The League of Women Voters. A storytelling generator could be employed by any organization that wants to extend content creation to the public, making this a widely applicable solution.